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National UFO Reporting Center
Sighting Report
Occurred : 4/24/2008 14:30 (Entered as : 04/24/2008 14:30)
Reported: 5/8/2008 12:26:12 AM 00:26
Posted: 6/12/2008
Location: Tucson, AZ
Shape: Light
Duration:1 Hour
Star in broad daylight

While working on the Tohono O'oddam Reservation, I observed a star like light in broad daylight directly overhead. My first impression was that it was a weather balloon, but it remained overhead for almost an hour with little descernable motion. I pondered whether it was a distant supernova, but have heard nothing over the astronomy news. It looked to be above the troposphere. I say this only as a former meteorologist. There is the slight chance it was a passing asteriod, which I have heard rumors of, but am not sure it was visible during the day.

The little motion I observed was in a NNE direction by no more than 5 degrees for duration of sighting. Eventually, I had to get back to surveying the area, and had to step in a building for an hour or so. The light was not visible when I tried to reaquire it an hour later.

My partner observed the same anomoly, but thought nothing of it. We have not mentioned it since.

Local military air traffic showed no interest in it, either. I watched numerous flights depart the Air Force base only to practice formations and usual touch and go's.

I have released countless weather balloons and tracked their paths across the sky. Never have I observed one shoot straight up, nor remain relatively motionless for an hour. Jet streams and upper level winds usually take the balloon out of sight, or the balloon pops when reaching high altitude.

I do not think it was a UFO (ET), a star, nor a balloon. Stars move west. This object drifted no more than 5 degrees NNE in an hour. Balloons pop or move rapidly to the east after reaching altitudes of 30,000ft and up. A near Earth asteriod is my best guess.